salad

Partie Trois: Paris, Pain au chocolat et Escargot

Partie Trois: Paris, Pain au chocolat et Escargot

Three beautiful days…eating our way through the city of lights…

A Taste of Paris

Ten years ago, my husband took me to Paris to celebrate our 20th wedding anniversary. It was an amazing trip, the adventure of a lifetime, a triumph on so many levels. Paris is truly a magical city and we ate, drank, toured, laughed, sat, strolled, and explored as much as possible. Since that year, we have taken other trips, exotic and foreign, but Paris still holds the power of unshakeable memories over us, always drawing us back into the "remember that time..."

One such remembrance is our actual anniversary dinner at the Michelin starred restaurant, Guy Savoy. The ambiance: elegant and reserved. The service: witty, attentive, and intelligent. The fare: delicious, rich, and artistic. The bill: exorbitant. That meal, that night, remains to this day in our top five food experiences of all time.

We were in love with each other, fell in love with the city and in turn, in love with all things France. Fast forward to this year when I have undertaken this crazy goal to cook my way through Fine Cooking magazine. I opened the April/May issue to find the "Moveable Feast" article highlighted a visit with none other than Guy Savoy (the chef and namesake of our beloved restaurant) and cookbook author, Patricia Wells, who resides in Paris! So I was quite excited to prepare the recipes from this particular issue. 

On a cold and windy evening in April, I invited friends to join us and they graciously agreed to suffer through this menu:

Spring Greens Salad with Fruit, Roquefort & Balsamic Dressing

Asparagus with Paprika Sabayon

Rib-eye Steak with Tarragon Chimichurri

Frites

Strawberry-Rhubarb Blitz Torte

The conversation was lively, the wine poured and though the steak was a bit underdone, I think the meal was a success. I'm definitely not Guy Savoy, but when I was crafting his sabayon (a cooked egg yolk sauce), I felt a renewed appreciation for the art that is Fine Dining. 

My experiment or goal or resolution, whatever you want to call it --to step out of my comfort zone and create recipes that I would not otherwise attempt--is succeeding. For the "numbers" people out there, I stand at 55 completed recipes out of 114 from 3 issues. Still a ways to go...hoping the June/July issue does not arrive for several more weeks!

 

Croutons 101

Why are we here today, ladies & gentleman? Because we love Bread in all of it’s delicious, crusty, chewy glory. But many of us are avoiding this marvel of yeast and wheat due to food allergies or fear of increased weight. For those that truly have an intolerance or even a life-threatening relationship with gluten, perhaps you should not read on. (Please consider transferring to another class, as Croutons 101 is not a good course for you.)

To my remaining students, I must confess that I too, have avoided pizza, crackers, hamburger buns, waffles, sandwiches, pretzels, and all other distant relatives to my very first addiction, Bread. I have blamed my slowed metabolism and increased pounds on bread, because I am not addicted to sweets. (I love a good piece of chocolate like every other red-blooded american girl but I don’t crave dessert.)

But in this course, we are going to learn to throw down our pre-conceived notions on the evils of bread. Instead, we will embrace the method by which I have learned to enjoy my favorite food in the world one nugget at a time.

Nunzio’s Croutons

 

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At this point, you may use the finished product to add crunch to any green salad or to float on top of a cup of soup. But feel free to do as I do and save some in a plastic bag to enjoy as a mid-afternoon snack when I am craving the bread that I denied myself at the restaurant we went to for lunch because I wanted to be good and not eat a sandwich. Deep breath. Repeat after me. Bread is not my enemy!

There are several other crouton recipes that I employ throughout the year. I make a bruschetta-type crisp for caesar salad, a buttery version for BLT salad and a cheese & cornbread beauty for tomato soup. The possibilities are endless. Croutons are also a good use of that beautiful whole-grain loaf that you purchased at the Farmers Market but forgot to eat and now the outside of the bread is kinda hard. (Or, throw chunks of it in the food processor and pulse until you have homemade breadcrumbs. Store in the freezer until you need them!)

In all seriousness, there is nothing like a great piece of warm bread, spread with salted butter or dipped in extra-virgin olive oil. So even though I will pop a few croutons to satisfy a craving in a week when I am cutting down on carbs, I also will ask for another basket of bread at Lucia because it is so soul-satisfying. <3

The IKEA Milestone

There are many different phases in the development of children from baby (completely dependent) to adult (hopefully independent). And as they near closer to that jumping off point into self-reliance, I think the benchmarks sometimes transition to becoming our own milestones.

Case in point, this past month my husband and I loaded up a rental truck and headed to Ft. Worth to transfer our college junior into a rental home that he is sharing with 5 other TCU students. I remember making this same trip six years ago with our daughter as she moved into a house two blocks from campus with 3 other girls. (Incidentally, all 4 housemates of “Casa Wabasha” are now MARRIED! How did that happen? Where did the time go?) And then, as in this summer, we moved a bed and several lovely boxes purchased from that mega-store, IKEA.

Sidebar: What is it with millennials and IKEA? I recently viewed a pre-showing of Reese Witherspoon’s new movie “Home Again” and one young man, in an attempt at seduction, offered to construct something from IKEA. Lol.

Back to the subject at hand…three boxes, three hours and three people to put together a six-drawer dresser for my son’s room! I am not exaggerating. When we finished, my son was thrilled. His room was complete and represents a safe, solitary haven to escape to from the stresses of upper level courses, internship applications and an ex-girlfriend. So I  consider the building of IKEA furniture a milestone in our continued advancement of moving him along the path to adulthood. Cross another one off the list. Had to do it. It’s done. Move on. No tears associated with this objective.

But two weeks later, when he texted me a picture of his first home-cooked meal made in the rental house kitchen, I felt a little more sentimental. He had requested I send him a few simple staple recipes and I recently came across an idea whereby you save these go-to recipes as contacts on your phone. Perfect for young people whose lives are on their smart phones; if they are at the grocery store, they have only to search for the recipe name in their contact list and they have the ingredients list in front of them! So he made spaghetti for himself. My baby made his first meal away from home AND it was not only edible, but delicious! I’m so proud. And a little sad…that he is one step closer to not needing me anymore. :(

james'&nbsp;first self-prepared meal as a college student

james' first self-prepared meal as a college student

Ahhhhh, the Salad days

No, I’m not making a reference to my youth, a time of innocence, as the term “salad days”  usually refers to, but I mean THE Salad Days. As in, my consumption of salad Every Single Day for the past two months! Beginning with the Whole30 in June, I have managed to consume some form of fresh green concoction each day to the point that I don’t want to break the streak. Not that it’s become a religious experience for me, heavens, no. However, I actually look forward to my daily salad with some anticipation now.


My sweet M-I-L, Jeanette, was the first to introduce me to the idea that salad belonged on every dinner table, even at home. Sure, you go out to eat at a nice restaurant and you’re offered a salad before your main course but very few families consistently consume  greens with their meals at home. So my family grew up with the expectation that salad graced the table every night in addition to our main meal and possibly alongside other vegetables and bread. It was often a simple mix of red lettuce, carrot slices, diced cucumbers and Good Seasons dressing. Side topic: the joke in our house is that the making of the nightly salad is the first chore assigned to a novice in the kitchen. When someone enters Ruth’s kitchen and asks if they can help, invariably the answer is “you can make the salad.” This is because I am a bit of a control freak and don’t want you in my way as I’m trying to finish getting dinner on the table and truly, how can you mess up the salad? :)

Anyway, I digress. Salads. Lots of them. I’ve had some fabulous ones lately, from salmon & avocado atop arugula tossed in a sun-dried tomato vinaigrette to a romaine, apricot, walnut, avocado, olive number drizzled with a garlic-tahini dressing. A phenomena has started to occur when we go out for lunch or dinner…I think I’m craving a particular kind of cuisine like Italian pasta & pizza or Southern fried chicken and waffles but when I arrive at the restaurant I can’t get my eyes to wander off the Salad section.

I once scoffed at persons who chose salads thinking they were the “diet” choice on the menu when in truth the dressings and croutons made them anything but light. But now I embrace fat as an important part of my daily consumption and realize that the yummy flavors in a good dressing cause me to consume more healthy greens! Win-win.

In short, these are MY salad days. Two salads are on the menu this week. Join me.

 

Mini Food Explorations - NYC Edition

Typically when I head to a destination that is known for it’s diverse and delicious food landscape, I have a list in hand of restaurants and cuisines to explore. And I did have plans over spring break to discover a couple of boroughs in NYC that we had not yet visited. Unfortunately, with flight cancellations and delays, misplaced luggage and of course, Stella the blizzard, the trip developed a survival agenda and those plans were put aside.

Rather, the goal became “what CAN we do?” and not “here’s what we will do.” And that was fine. I’m not the girl to wallow over failed plans. So  I took my son to Burger & Lobster which we had extolled as an amazing burger palace with lobster thrown in. The Flatiron district restaurant did not disappoint. We sat at the bar and chowed down on cheeseburgers, crispy fries and a sweet, creamy lobster roll. Their once 3 item only menu now offers 3 different lobster roll versions, 3 burger varieties and 3 ways to have your fresh lobster. From there we walked through Eataly, always a fun stroll for food lovers and the Italophile in all of us.

The following day, my son’s mission was to taste an authentic New York bagel. We walked 11 blocks from our hotel to Ess-a-Bagel and found a line to the door. Luckily we discovered a second line — the Express-Bagels-only line and stood behind just 5 other patrons. As luck would have it, it was the best place to be where we could see into the back as the cooks pulled the bagels from the water and placed them on sheet pans which were shuffled to the front, right behind our counter, and placed directly into the oven! When we reached the top of the line, we learned they were out-of-stock of all flavors save two—the plain and the everything! So that’s what we ordered, along with plain cream cheese and some lox. We sat at a table and devoured the warm, chewy, crusty balls of bread as though it was our final meal! Oh. my. goodness. I am forever spoiled for these bagels.

By the way, I walked all over sodden, icy, slushy, snowy, dirty Manhattan in my Ugg rain boots. They kept my feet warm and dry and I happily splashed my way over hundreds of blocks and up/down countless subway stairs. I highly recommend! 

After a hearty bagel breakfast, we were ready for some exercise and because he’d not yet seen Central Park (there was a blizzard in the city early in the week…did I already mention that?) we headed there and were lucky to cross 5th Avenue ahead of it’s closure for the St. Paddy’s day parade. Frozen ponds, snow balls, and the Boathouse for hot apple cider and cappuccino.

From there we headed to The Metropolitan Museum of Art and after walking 30 blocks or so, I was hungry again! I’m a little embarrassed to admit that we purchased our admission tickets and headed directly to the cafe! But I’m so glad we did…I had the most amazing, out-of-a-plastic-container salad. I was so obsessed by this combination of grain, green, carrot, cheese and dressing that when we returned to Dallas, I made it on Sunday and ate it 3 days in a row!!! So…it’s on the menu this week. See what happens when you eat in an unlikely place just because you’re starving? Sometimes food-joy is waiting there for you!

There is one more food memory I want to share with you. We decided to see a show very last minute and therefore had no plans for a pre-broadway supper. I knew JT would love some pasta but we struck out repeatedly for reservations at all of the recommended Times Square area spots. We finally found il Corso, within walking distance of our hotel for a 5:45 pm meal. It was tiny, maybe 12 tables and the pasta was made in-house. Service was attentive and charming. Divine Cacio e Pepe. That’s it. That’s all I have to say.

A fun trip, though nothing like originally planned but delicious all the same. Lesson learned: always have an open mind, an optimistic palate and a willing stomach. Oh, and good walking shoes!

Picky eaters of the world unite!

True confession: I was you. My pickiness was legendary among our relatives and my mother’s circle of friends. “Ruthie is so picky! She won’t eat pancakes or eggs or ham sandwiches!” My mother, ever intent on getting substantive food down my esophagus, would warn that she would reheat my breakfast at lunchtime if I didn’t finish the morning meal. I perfected the chew-then-spit-in-napkin move to the point it was undetectable even by my brother, who loved to watch me like a hawk. I was a pro.

Obviously, I haven’t been a picky eater for years. All of those “no thank-yous” of the past have become “yes, please” and “more, please!” Much to the detriment of my figure. Do you realize that your metabolism rate decreases 5% every year after the age of 35? How are we supposed to combat nature working against us?!!

But back to the subject at hand: individuals with narrowed taste preferences. There really is no formula to creating adventurous young eaters. In my parents’ house, we were berated to clean our plates because it was a crime to waste food. Conversely, when my children were young, without pressure, I constantly made a variety of foods so that they became accustomed to always eating something different. But the outcome was the same from my upbringing to my brood. We all love food and try almost anything and everything. We associate good meals with family, comfort and communicating. If there is a celebration to be had, it’s going to involve a great dinner.

So be patient with your picky eaters—they’ll come around eventually. And if they decide never to eat coconut, pickled herring or raw onions, cut them some slack. Take it from a reformed picky eater, some things are still worth avoiding!

Cowboy Pot Pie

Cowboy Pot Pie

SAVETHE DATE: Holiday sides, pies & gift tastings will be on November 3-4. You don’t want to miss the opportunity to try our line-up of yummy offerings for your Thanksgiving & Christmas tables as well as gourmet gifts to make your life so easy in December.

Good Ole Dr. Knapp

Our children had the best pediatrician for many years, Dr. Roger Knapp. I cannot forget his kind words to me when I was a new mother and was in his office for a well child checkup. He checked the baby over, discussed developmental milestones and then he said to me, “Well, I think she’s just doing amazing. Tell me: do you have any advice I can pass along to other mothers? Because you’re doing a wonderful job with your newborn.” I think I realized even then that his goal was to imbue me with confidence because most new mothers are full of doubt, but it still felt so good to hear these words from him.
Dr. Knapp always had nuggets of wisdom to share and he frequently discussed the emotional stages that the children would pass through at each checkup. When my daughter was a pre-teen we discussed peer pressure and body image. He told her to go to the mall, sit on a bench and people watch. If she could find 5 girls that she would gladly trade bodies with, he wouldn’t believe it. Then he turned to me and said, “You too, Mom.” Because we are all plagued by self-doubt and negative body image.

IMG_6458Dr. Knapp had walls and walls of patient pictures. If you sent him a family Christmas card or a graduation announcement, a school picture, it went up on the wall. Every time we visited his office, we would search for our family’s pictures. The kids would laugh – “you looked like a dork that year!” They really enjoyed seeing themselves in his hall of fame.

One thing my children will never forget: Dr. Knapp’s awful, corny jokes. He told so many Aggie jokes — it was his Alma Mater — and physical puns. We would groan and laugh appreciatively.

And he was a big proponent of family meals. Dr. Knapp insisted that children who sat at a table for dinner and talked with their siblings and parents were more intelligent, had better vocabularies and were most likely to be articulate! He was a wise man and I almost cried when I took my son to see him for his final checkup at 18 and his nurse told me “this is it. Dr. Knapp doesn’t see them after they go to college.” But we were so blessed to have him with us every step of the way while raising these children.

I love to reminisce about special people who have touched my life or that of my family, and sometimes I fear that if I don’t write about a memory that I may forget the impact they’ve had on us. So thanks for indulging my trip down the lane….

The pickup schedule is abbreviated this week as I am headed to Colorado to meet someone very special! And next week will be short as well because I have a mini-vacay with my one-and-only so I plan to post that menu on the online store pretty quick.

Remember that if you have any questions about the menu or how this works, email me. Call me. Text me. 214-675-1932

Check out the Menu for Aug 29, 2016. Order online here. Please order by 10am the day prior to your pickup and be sure to provide your cell number. Pickup schedule at 9800 Preston Road is as follows:

Tuesday 2-5pm (order by 10am Monday)
Wednesday 2-5pm (order by 10am Tuesday)

Table for three

The year I last had all of my children home for Easter was 2010. In 2011 my daughter Stephanie was the first to leave the nest, heading to Arkansas to visit her then fiancé‘s family. We would have numbered 7 that year including fiancé. This past year, daughter #2 was scheduled to work at the hospital in Round Rock and couldn’t make it home so we were 5 and should have been 9. Flash forward to present day when son #1 and wife spent the weekend with her extended family in Atlanta and we were just 3 for church services and brunch. (Could have been 11) Although our family is growing in number, the attendees are shrinking.
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I remember Easter Sundays past when I was admonished by my daughters to wake them early enough so they could “get ready” for church in the morning and the sound of roaring blow dryers at 7 am. Then discovering that one of the boys was still in bed and rushing to get him ready. And waiting in the car for the last curl to be placed and stressing we would not have a seat in the main church.

Today was not reminiscent of one of those Sundays! I was up early, ran to Starbucks because we were out of coffee. I did my hair, applied my makeup and dressed while my son and husband were ready in a third of the time and waited patiently for me. We arrived early at the church, easily found a pew to accommodate the three of us and waited for the service to begin. We had a leisurely brunch, snapped a couple of pictures, changed our clothes and walked around the Arboretum for an hour. Lastly, we drove our Horned Frog back to campus and came home for a light supper of champagne and a charcuterie board. It’s an ever changing landscape around here these days but I am adjusting! :)

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I hope each of you had a wonderful Easter weekend, whether it was a hectic, egg-hunting, tear-inducing event or a quiet, day like mine. He is Risen!

Place your order by email to butterfieldgourmet@gmail.com and please do so by 10am the day prior to your desired pickup.

Pickup Times for 3/28-3/31

Tuesday – NW Hwy & Preston, 2:30 pm, 3pm, 3:30 pm
Wednesday – NW Hwy & Preston, 2:30 pm, 3pm
Forest & Preston, 4:30 pm
Thursday – NW Hwy & Preston, 2:30 pm, 3pm
Forest & Preston, 4:30 pm

BG Menu for mar 28

A (very) short essay on Fatherhood

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Yesterday was Father’s Day and I heard some statistic on the radio the week prior about the difference in spending for Mother’s Day and it’s counterpart. The percentage spent for gifts on FD was significantly less (>40%?) and when I asked my son why he thought this was so, he ironically stated “because somehow Mother’s Day is also Wife’s Day.” But I think it’s also because Dads actually prefer experiences over tangible gifts. Many a father would prefer a quiet afternoon watching Jordan Spieth win the US Open or going fishing with buddies or playing catch in their front yards. My sons took their Dad out to play a round of golf and when I texted my husband to ask how it was going, his reply made my heart sing – “We are playing poorly but good to spend time with my boys.”

The different roles of Mother and Father were once well defined. Dad was the breadwinner, Mom raised the children and kept the house. My childhood was much along those lines with a couple of exceptions. My mother indeed made all the meals, clothed and bathed us, kept our home sparkling clean and kissed our boo-boos. But as she was from a different culture and her grasp of the English language was limited, some tasks were absorbed by my father. One of my fondest childhood memories is of my father reading to me and my brother and sister. He read us the entire Tales of Narnia by C.S. Lewis using different voices for the characters. He also shared a gospel tract with me and helped me pray for salvation. He taught me to tie my shoes, ride a bike, write my name and read.

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As a Mother myself, I am fortunate to be blessed with a husband who has worked beside me to make our family whole. Our roles are defined and blurry at the same time. When our children were small, many times John would be the first to announce. “Bath time!” and cart the kids to the tub. If they were sick at night, he would always clean up the mess — something for which I did not have the stomach — putting fresh sheets on their beds. Yes, he was the one that rough-housed with them but he also did dishes while I read them a story and put them down for the night.

So I’m really glad my husband was able to spend this Father’s Day enjoying an experience with his boys. My daughter-in-law and I made him a meal of favorites.

Cheese Plate featuring Delice de Bourgogne (JB’s favorite triple cream cheese)

Green Salad with carrots, cucumbers, feta & craisins

Pan-fried Filet Mignon with Horseradish cream

Sautéed Garlic Spinach

Oven Roasted Yukon Gold Steak Fries

and for dessert:

Cherry Pie a la mode

I think he had a pretty good day. Personally I am not a fan of Cherry Pie but this one was quite delicious. Hopefully your father’s day was special and filled with favorite things as well. Here’s what I’m cooking this week. Menu for June 22 and did I mention that former Jesuit Ranger, Jordan Spieth, won the US Open? :))   Have a great week!

The real superwoman - Jeanette Weisenberger Butterfield

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Last Sunday I took you down memory lane to my mother’s story and this week it’s only fair that I tell you about my lovely mother-in-law, Jeanette. She is responsible for my wonderful husband’s appearance in the world and as we celebrated his birthday this past weekend, of course she comes to mind. Incidentally, he is the middle child in a line of seven. (I am the middle of 3 — don’t middles always end up together?!)

My first impression of Jeanette was through her son’s eyes. He talked a lot about what an amazing cook his mother was/is and how she served delicious meals to their table every single night for his crowd of a family. And dessert. Every night. Baked. Homemade. Desserts are a big thing with Michiganians, I’ve decided. So I couldn’t wait to meet her and she was everything he’d described her to be: sweet, quiet, welcoming and a Fantastic cook.  Her menus became the model for what I served our young family over the years. If I were to put her dinner philosophy to paper, I believe the list below summarizes it well.

1. The table must be dressed with a freshly pressed tablecloth.

2. Grace will be said before the meal commences, always by Pop, and ending with his signature “We pray for the gifts of wisdom, love, courage and perseverance.”

3. Every meal must have a tossed green salad. With no regard for extra dishes to wash, Jeanette happily adds salad bowls or plates to every table.

4. The main course will be hearty, delicious and hot. And plentiful. When you are feeding a crowd of 9, be sure to have enough for everyone to eat and be satiated.

5. There must be at least one side dish, either a vegetable or a starch but preferably both.  See crowd comment above.

6. Milk is the beverage of choice to accompany dinner, especially during the week. Wine is a close second.

7. THERE WILL BE DESSERT. Sometimes, if everyone is too full from the delicious dinner, dessert is moved to the time slot after dishes are done. The sweet treats range from homemade Angel Food Cake topped with macerated strawberries and freshly whipped, sweetened cream to tart Rhubarb Pie (btw, I had never tasted home-whipped cream before her’s and it changed my life) Of course, there are always a few of her famous cookies on a plate and plenty of ice cream. On the weekends when we dined with them several evenings in a row, she would bake something fresh each day, even if the previous evening’s dessert had not been completely consumed. Another rule: Jeanette takes the first bite. Pop is the enforcer of this rule. Do not break it.

I think it is safe to say that Jeanette manifested love for her family with her work in the kitchen. Oh, and through her ironing…she is a master in the laundry room but I’ll save that for another blog.;)  Check out the Menu for the next few days and give your mother-in-law a big hug; since mine is arriving midweek, I will do the same! -R

Such a super Saturday at the Cultivate Festival in Irving!!

Saturday was just amazing, great bands, great food, huge crowds, wonderful to meet customers! We sold a lot of chocolate pie, pecan pie bars and GF pecan pie bars and of course, our beloved, S’mores bark.  The Dallas News Guidelive photographer was taking pictures and we got a nice mention in her slideshow - http://bit.ly/1rTIiIO.
Here’s a pic of my crew that were such a huge part of Butterfield Gourmet’s successful day - IMG_3364

and here’s the link to this week’s offerings Menu for Oct 20.

Must summer come to an end? Sigh. Menu for August 18-22, 2014

The end of summer is always bittersweet.  It signals the last of lazy days and vacations, and the beginning of busy schedules, early mornings and new school years.  Even those households who are empty of children are affected by the coming season — traffic patterns change, so you adjust your schedule; you stay out of the stores at certain hours… My menu this week is a salute to the beauties of late summer produce: zucchini, raspberries and eggplant. Hope you find something that you can enjoy in one of your final meals of summer!
It’s a college visit week for us (getting a quick one in before my son goes back to school on Friday!) so Pick up is WEDNESDAY and THURSDAY only this week.

To order, please use the Contact tab (or email butterfieldgourmet@gmail.com) and state which items you would like and what day you would like to pick up at the Preston Commons location. Please order by noon for pickup the following day. Pick up is from 4-6 pm, Wednesday or Thursday at 8115 Preston Rd, Suite 140, inside the Cafe Gourmet on the Go shop.

Salad:  Southwestern Cornbread Salad is back! This salad is the best and is destined to go up in price this fall.  It is hearty and addictive. $15/serves 3-4. Veg. GF avail.

Soup: Chicken Tortilla – my classic, traditional soup is a best seller and this latest batch includes the freshest summer zucchini as well as fresh Hatch chiles. $15/quart serves 3. GF

Quiche: Summer Squash, Bacon & Mozzarella – the surprise about this quiche is that it is actually on the light side without losing anything in the flavor arena! $20/pie

Pot Pie: Homestyle Chicken ($25) or Steak & Ale ($30)

Entree: Eggplant Parmesan – this version of the classic Italian casserole highlights delicate slices of fried eggplant, gooey mozzarella and a bright tomato sauce. The breading on the eggplant has been replaced by a crispy topping over the entire dish. Serve with a crisp green salad and a loaf of crusty bread. $30 serves 4-6. Veg. GF avail.

Dessert: Fresh Raspberry Pie – Double crust pie filled with tart berries that is surprisingly delicious with cinnamon ice cream (take softened vanilla bean ice cream and stir in just a smidge of ground cinnamon!) $25/pie. Veg.

We are happy to create any of our pies and quiches with gluten-free products. Please note that we do not operate a fully gluten-free kitchen and some cross-contamination is possible.

Menu for June 16-20, 2014

To order, please use the Contact tab (or email butterfieldgourmet@gmail.com) and tell me which items you would like and what day you would like to pick up at my Preston Commons location. Please order by NOON for pickup from 4-6 pm the following day.
Pick up is from 4-6 pm, Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday.

8115 Preston Rd, Suite 140 inside the Cafe Gourmet on the Go shop

Salad: Baby Blue - mixed field greens, orange segments, strawberries, blue cheese and a balsamic vinaigrette combine for a delicious salad to accompany any summer meal. Also includes my Sweet & Spicy Pecans for a crunchy kick topping.  $15 serves 2-3 GF

Quiche: Green Chile Cheese - I’m showing my roots with this one! I grew up in the southwest, where Hatch chiles find their way into every course.  $20/pie serves 4-6**

Pot pie:  French Chicken  - this is a brand new pie that I am trying out and I am offering it at a reduced introductory price, hoping that you will try it and give me your opinion! ($20), Homestyle Chicken ($25) or Beef Pot Roast ($30)**

Dessert: Lemon Pound Cake – this citrus classic comes in a loaf and is lovely with coffee. $15/loaf.

  • GF crust is available for the quiche or any of the pot pies. Additional charge applies.

Thanks for your orders and your referrals!

Happy Memorial Day! Menu for May 26-30, 2014

Today we remember all of the brave men and women who sacrificed their lives to defend our freedom!  I know many of you are out of town for the holiday but I will be cooking this week….
To order, please use the Contact tab (or email butterfieldgourmet@gmail.com) and tell me which items you would like and what day you would like to pick up at my Preston Commons location. Please order by 10 am for pickup from 4-6 pm the following day.

Pick up is from 4-6 pm, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, or by request, Friday.

8115 Preston Rd, Suite 140 inside the Cafe Gourmet on the Go shop

Quiche: Asparagus Custard – unlike my other quiche, I bake this in a puff pastry shell! This rich pie comes across light.  $20/pie serves 4-6**

Pot pie:  Two choices this week-  Curried Chicken ($25) or Texas Brisket ($30)**

Entree: Italian-American Meatballs with sauce and Spaghetti – my meatballs have a little kick! IF you have any leftover, they are also awesome in hoagie rolls with mozzarella melted on top! $30 serves 4-6  GF available

Salad: Edamame & Quinoa -  this refreshing salad is bright and colorful with corn and cherry tomatoes and a bright lime dressing.  $12 serves 3-4 GF

Dessert: Grandma Alice’s Apple Pie – nothing is more American than apple pie!  My personal favorite fruit pie, it’s the first one I learned to make. $20/pie

Cookie: Heath Bar Cookies - irresistible cookies with chopped candy bars. $10/dozen medium cookies

  • GF crust is available for the quiche or any of the pot pies. Additional charge applies.

Thanks for your orders and your referrals!

SHORT WEEK! Menu for the week of May 12, 2014

I am closing shop early this week due to a trip so pick up will be available TUESDAY and WEDNESDAY only!
To order, please use the Contact tab (or email butterfieldgourmet@gmail.com) and tell me which items you would like and what day you would like to pick up at my Preston Commons location. Please order by 10 am for pickup from 4-6 pm the following day.

Pick up is from 4-6 pm, Tuesday and Wednesday.

8115 Preston Rd, Suite 140 inside the Cafe Gourmet on the Go shop

Quiche: Broccoli & Cheddar - for a long time, this was the only way I would eat broccoli…  $20/pie serves 4-6**

Pot pie:  Two choices this week-  Homestyle Chicken ($25) or Steak & Ale ($30)**

Entree: Spiced Pork Tenderloin with couscous – a flavorful departure from the ordinary, the pork is rubbed with an Indian spice rub then braised in a garlic broth until tender. Served on a bed of raisin and almond couscous. $30 serves 4-6 (available with GF couscous, small up charge applies)

Salad: Thai Veggie Salad with Peanut Dressing -  this is a salad with substance: bell peppers, snow peas, carrots, radishes and more! Topped with a creamy peanut dressing that has a little kick.  $12 serves 2-3 GF

Dessert: Monster Cookies - these are large cookies filled with lots of yumminess!  $10/6 giant cookies GF

  • GF crust is available for the quiche or any of the pot pies. Additional charge applies.

Thanks for your orders and your referrals!